August 12, 2011
"

I don’t think I’m alone in not wanting to have a boss tell me what to do. I refuse to have a boss tell me what to do. The bargaining tool that’s unspoken in that statement is that I will happily relinquish the power to tell other people what to do. That, for me, is anarchism. I won’t order you about, if you don’t order me about. And together we’ll make it work.

It sounds so naïve. But I’d rather have that sense of possibilities, of something better, than the all-too-obvious battle being waged between dislocated youth and millionaire politicians.

"

Boff Whalley 

(via liberationfrequency)

August 12, 2011

(via tardissr)

August 12, 2011
Boff Whalley: 'In defence of anarchy'

joinakibbutz:

It’s the catch-all term that’s being used to describe this week’s riots. But is this really anarchy? Not even close, says Chumbawumba’s Boff Whalley, a self-professed anarchist

(via liberationfrequency)

August 12, 2011
liberationfrequency:

“Heroism on command, senseless violence, and all the loathsome nonsense that goes by the name of patriotism — how passionately I hate them!”
- Albert Einstein

liberationfrequency:

“Heroism on command, senseless violence, and all the loathsome nonsense that goes by the name of patriotism — how passionately I hate them!”

- Albert Einstein

August 11, 2011
Bastard Neoliberals.

likeagswift:

Loving John Prescott, Fraser Nelson and David Davis bickering over two styles of education policy which don’t work. Archbishop John Sentamu hit the nail on the head. The meritocratic targets of the National Curriculum don’t educate anyone but the whitest and wealthiest.

(via likeagswift-deactivated20120813)

August 11, 2011
Tom Morello on the England riots.

(via graverave-deactivated20130623)

August 11, 2011

(via liberationfrequency)

August 11, 2011

liberationfrequency:

The Specials | Ghost Town

This is a good article from The Guardian, reflecting on the riots and the symbolism of this song which hit the top of the charts the week of the riots across Britain thirty years ago and seemed to explain the causes better than any sociological essay or newpaper editorial. 

Why the Specials’ Ghost Town is still the sound of a country in crisis

Not all protest songs offer political solutions. Some, such as the Specials’ 1981 hit, are better at capturing a mood of anxiety

On Sunday morning – after Tottenham but before London’s rioting went viral – I was reading reports of the violence when Gimme Shelter came on the radio. The combination was unexpectedly visceral. The Rolling Stones’ slow-burning jeremiad played out over images of riot police and buildings on fire. Possibly this suggests a chronic inability on my part not to relate dramatic events to music. It’s a habit intensified by working on a history of protest music in which songs and historical events become inextricably linked. But it brought to mind a phrase used by Rock Against Racism co-founder David Widgery: “crisis music.”

Widgery meant music that responded to the specific danger of the National Front in the late-70s but to me the phrase has a broader application. Crisis music is a subset of protest music that is not always perceived as such because it captures a mood of anxiety and imminent collapse, and offers no solutions. 

Read on… 

(Source: southcoasting)

August 11, 2011
"…the true Anarchist decries all influences save those of love and reason. Ideas are his only arms."

— Elbert Hubbard

(Source: oh-nicoke, via liberationfrequency)

August 11, 2011
A few ideas for a world without money...

Contained is the technocracy study course, full text for anyone interested to read, now personally i consider myself a libertarian socialist but Hubbert makes a good point as to how technology in our modern era grants ideas for a moneyless (debtless) society a hell of a lot more flexibility. The key point of the book is that human need may be matched and met through a scientifically and efficiently planned economy.

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